Expert Tips for Fresh 48 Newborn Photography, Part Two in Evergreen Park and Mokena, IL

Expert Tips for Fresh 48 Newborn Photography, Part Two in Evergreen Park and Mokena, IL
Expert Tips for Fresh 48 Newborn Photography, Part Two in Evergreen Park and Mokena, IL

Jamie Gertler is a professional photographer with a talent for capturing those perfect moments with your newborn. To see more of her work, click here.

In my previous blog post, you learned the tools to take professional-looking photos of your newborn baby in the hospital.

Now, let’s focus on how you tell your story by capturing these special moments.

Let’s start with the prep work. In the weeks leading up to giving birth, order any special props and newborn outfits.

Need some inspiration?

Start with letter board options here and here. One of my favorites is Hello My Name Is Stickers. For more traditional, go with swaddles, bows or hats, the ultrasound photo, or bring family heirlooms that you want included in photos .

Now that you have what you need, pack it in your hospital bag and you’re ready to go.

You’re at the hospital to have a baby, so let’s start there (with the big picture). Take photos of:

  • Hospital exterior/hospital sign (this can be on arrival or departure)
  • Hospital room number
  • Hospital room
  • Hospital whiteboard
  • You and your partner before the baby is born (with a mask and without)
  • One last photo of the bump before your baby arrives

From there, take a break and focus on what you’re there for — having a baby. Then, after giving birth and making sure you and your baby are healthy, have your partner take the following photographs:

  • The time your baby is born (the clock in the hospital room, a screenshot on your phone, etc.)
  • Doctor/nurse/midwife/doula holding your baby
  • Your baby on the scale
  • Cutting the umbilical cord
  • Both parents holding your baby for the first time
  • Faces of both partners when looking at their baby after being born
  • Skin-to-skin for both partners
  • Have a nurse/midwife/doula take a photo of both parents and baby

After getting a few photos of his/her first moments, put your camera down and just enjoy being in the moment with your partner. This time will only come once, so you want to be as present as you can (while being able to capture these special moments at the same time).

Then, when things slow down a bit, you can think about the intricate details. This does not have to be immediately … take time, get rest, and start fresh in the morning or anytime during your hospital stay after your newborn is fed.

Detailed photos not to be missed:

Hospital bassinet photos

  • First baby portrait
  • Baby in the bassinet in front of the window
  • Baby in bassinet from above
  • Baby holding ultrasound photo (before and after)
  • Birth announcement photo (hello sticker with name, letter board, etc.)
  • Close-ups of your baby’s little features: tiny feet, hands, ears, hair, eyes, nose, and lips
  • All of the emotions and little expressions (the good, the bad, and even the not-so-cute)
  • Hospital bracelets and tags
  • Baby in a diaper, swaddle, hospital blanket, and special outfit with a hat or bow
  • Belly button clip
  • Bassinet sign with baby in the photo
  • Parents leaning over the bassinet with baby in it

Family photos

  • First family portrait
  • Parents holding the baby (separately and together) in front of the window, in bed, etc.
  • Both parents sitting in bed (holding baby, kissing baby, looking at baby)
  • Nose to nose
  • Make hearts with your hands around your baby’s feet
  • Baby holding your fingers
  • Parents changing the baby

Perspective shots

  • How you see your baby (hold your baby and have your partner take a photo from behind you)
  • Show the tiny size of the baby compared to other things in the hospital room (hospital bed, stuffed animal, etc.)

I hope this shot list helps you to create your own fresh 48 photos in the hospital. Feel free to print this out or take a screenshot of this posing guide to bring with you to the hospital. Try not to focus too much on getting all of the perfect posed photographs.

Remember, your story will be complete and more meaningful when you capture the sweet, organic, raw, unposed moments in every shot.

Good luck!